Yasmin wins at Hickstead

West Sussex-based Yazmin Pinchen enjoyed another Hickstead win, this week claiming the 1.40m Open with Van De Vivaldi. A total of 111 starters came forward for the class, which was the first to be held in the International Arena, with 19 combinations going clear in the first round. Yazmin was able to set a strong time that no one else could catch. 

“It wasn’t my best jump-off to be honest, we could have gone quicker,” she said. “I’m obviously delighted with him but I was worried the time could be beaten.” 

Yasmin Pincher in winning action at Hickstead
Photo: www.spidge.co.uk.

“It wasn’t my best jump-off to be honest, we could have gone quicker,” she said. “I’m obviously delighted with him but I was worried the time could be beaten.

“But at his best he’s unbeatable against the clock, he can take a stride out so easily and he’s so careful.”his best he’s unbeatable against the clock, he can take a stride out so easily and he’s so careful.”

Hickstead is  livestreaming the action from the International Arena for the next few days, courtesy of ClipMyHorse.TV. Watch the action live on Hickstead.TV. You can also watch all our feature classes from our international season on demand on ClipMyHorse.TV, as well as ordering videos of your jumping rounds or showing classes.

Mounted Branch earns Ride Safe award

Lancashire Constabulary’s Mounted Branch (LCMB) led by example when taking part in the British Horse Society’s (BHS) Ride Safe Award, demonstrating to riders how important it is to protect themselves when riding.
The three hour practical assessment saw the officers ride in a variety of environments, including a riding school demonstration and continuing on to the streets of Penwortham for an on the job evaluation, demonstrating their safety skills and knowledge.
Following successful completion of the assessment, five officers and BHS North West Regional Manager Lyndsay Dring, who took the award alongside LCMB, were presented with their Ride Safe Award.

Lancashire Constabulary’s Mounted Branch taking part in the BHS Ride Safe Award
Photo: Lancashire Constabulary

The British Horse Society’s Director of Safety, Alan Hiscox said: “We’re thrilled that Lancashire Constabulary took our Ride Safe Award, which enables all riders to have the knowledge and skills to protect themselves. We hope that this award, together with our Dead Slow campaign to educate drivers how to safely pass horses on the road, can potentially help to save the lives of horses, riders and drivers.”
Sgt Adam Pearson from Lancashire Constabulary Mounted Branch said: “We work closely with The British Horse Society. It is a wonderful organisation that the community should engage with and use their comprehensive website which offers advice for all road users. We looked forward to our assessment day and also our continued work with The British Horse Society in the future.”
Road safety is a particular concern for many horse riders, including the LCMB.
The BHS launched its Dead Slow campaign in 2016 in response to alarming statistics from the BHS horseaccidents.org.uk website showing that since 2010, 230 horses have died, and 39 riders have been killed on UK roads.

Pony Club Endurance Championships

The Pony Club Endurance Championships were held recently in stunning surroundings at Euston Park, Suffolk, alongside the HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Endurance Cup Festival UK Endurance Masters.

Pony Club Members were honoured to be part of an International event, where professional endurance riders from all over the world were competing across some of the best endurance tracks in the UK.

Organised by HPG Endurance Ltd, part of the HPower Group, in collaboration with Endurance GB, the event hosted 51 Pony Club members taking part in rides ranging from 20 to 56km.

Pony Club Senior Endurance Team
Photo courtesy of the Pony Club

Results:  Open  – Ella Pomroy (Easton Harriers Hunt) won by a whisker with 48.65 points riding Redwings Milky Way. Intermediate  – Georgia Brenton (Bisley & Sandown Chase) won with 62.28 points riding Townahaw Buster .Senior Novice level – Hannah Crocombe (Curre Hunt) won with 46.79 points with Jubilee Belle. Junior Novice level – another close finish, but the win went to Elizabeth Molyneux (Bedale & West of Yore Hunt) with 40.5 points riding Kingswell Shearwater. Grassroots level – Olivia Rosin (Whaddon Chase) won with 48.74 points riding Ziggy. Olivia also picked up Best Newcomer.

Team – the Mixed Team of Alex Powell (Brecon & Talybont Hunt riding Brohedydd The Duke), Ella Pomroy (Easton Harriers Hunt riding Redwings Milky Way), Honor Farley (East Cornwall Hunt riding Another Firebird Rising) and Georgia Brenton (Bisley & Sandown Chase riding Townahawe Buster) won with 147.01points

Robert Blane, Chairman of Pony Club Endurance, said: “’I am so grateful to Nick Brooks-Ward and HPower for inviting us to Euston Park for our Endurance Championships. Nothing was too much trouble for them and they went out of their way to welcome us to what is probably one of the best Endurance venues in Europe. We are all already looking forward to next year.”

Endurance Riding is a ride, usually over open country, along a specified route for a set distance with specific speed requirements.  Competitors are issued with a map of the route a few days before the competition which they need to study carefully and measure in order to plan their ride.  The result of the competition depends not only on the speed achieved, but also on the soundness and recovery rate of the horse when finishing.

There are five types of Pony Club Endurance Rides, each differing in distance.  The shorter Robin and Merlin Training rides, open to Members aged five and over, are an ideal introduction to the discipline.

There are three classifications of competition or qualification rides which are called Kestrel (Novice Qualifier), Osprey (Intermediate Qualifier) and Eagle (Open Qualifier).

Anyone with a sound pony or horse can participate in Pony Club Endurance. Members do not need a particular breed or type of pony or any specialist equipment.

William Funnell at Hickstead Championships

The Al Shira’aa Derby champion William Funnell will return to Hickstead next week for the All England Jumping Championships (30 August – 2 September).

William is among a line-up of leading national showjumpers who have entered for the four-day fixture, which has classes from 90cm up to a £6,000 1.40m Grand Prix.

William Funnell competing with Billy Buckingham
Photo: Nigel Goddard

Another to watch will be Ireland’s Shane Breen, who has had an excellent season on home turf at Hickstead, including wins in the Bunn Leisure Derby Trial and a third place in the Al Shira’aa Derby.

Phillip Miller, another former Derby champion, is already a dual winner of the All England Grand Prix, and he will be returning for a third crack at the title.

Other riders taking part include Jake Saywell, Lucy Townley, Nicole Pavitt, Steven Franks, John Popely, Georgia Tame, Yazmin Pinchen, Louise Saywell and Amy Inglis.

Husband and wife David and Louise Simpson have both had plenty of success at the All England Jumping Course, and both line up at this national championships. Northamptonshire showjumper Tim Stockdale – a former winner of the Longines BHS King George V Gold Cup – is due to compete, along with his son Joseph, 19, while cousins George and Tom from the famous Whitaker showjumping dynasty are also among the entries.

The show was first held in 2011, with the aim of promoting the grassroots level of the sport as well as giving novice horses the chance to gain experience jumping in the International Arena at Hickstead.

More than 1,200 horses are entered for this year’s show, which is completely free to spectators. As well as five rings of showjumping, there will be a small shopping area, with a select number of equestrian trade stands. The action from the International Arena will be livestreamed from Friday to Sunday on ClipMyHorse.TV and Hickstead.TV.

The Clubhouse Bar & Grill will be open all day throughout the show, and the Bollinger Bar will be open in the evenings, offering a full a la carte menu.

RDA group’s successful fundraiser

Long Furlong Riding for Disabled Group has benefited from a successful fundraising event at the recent Ashington Fete, where it ran a tombola stall.

The group has sent a huge thank you too to all those that contributed bottles for the day and to Val, who supplied and wrapped up 100 children’s prizes.

The event was on a warm, fine day and a camper van was used to transport all the bottles, cones of sweets and other items to the stall. Volunteers stuck to their tasks until and last bottle was sold and the fine cone of sweets was gone.This year, this deserving RDA group has raised £818.00 (£25 of which was from donations). This was a truly amazing result from a village event.

Long Furlong RDA group using its outdoor facilities

The general public were drawn in by the number of bottles of alcohol to be won and the children’s Jolly Jam Jars idea was a big hit. Youngsters were delighted with their prizes and very happy that their ticket was a winning one, even though every ticket won a prize. There was one exception, one little toddler couldn’t care less about her prize but was thrilled with her raffle ticket!

The group has thanked all its volunteers, riders, carers, friends and families who yet again donated our superb array of prizes and has sent a special thank you to Val who spent a lot of money and time producing 100 decorated cones and jam jars for the children’s tombola.

Members have thanked the many volunteers who worked hard throughout the day to ensure this fundraising event was an outstanding success.

Long Furlong RDA group is now based at Chestnuts Riding School, London Road, Pyecombe, BN45 7FJ, where it provides the opportunity for disabled people to enjoy riding, with the experience benefiting their health and well-being.

Moorcroft demonstration of long-reined and ridden horses

A demonstration of long-reined and ridden horses takes place at Moorcroft Racehorse Welfare Centre at Huntingrove Stud, Slinfold, West Sussex on Saturday September 1.

The centre has an outstanding reputation for its immense success in retraining ex-racehorses so that they can have a bright future when they leave racing- going on to lead fulfilling lives in new, caring homes outside the sport.

The event starts at 10.30am and refreshments will be available. Book your place now, at £12.50 per person by contacting manager Mary Frances on 07929 666408 or email moorcroftracehorse@gmail.com

Some of the horses currently receiving expert retraining at the centre include Don’t Stare, Irving, and Zigger Zagger.

Don’t Stare, born in 2010, is a bay gelding who arrived at Moorcroft after he had keyhole surgery for painful kissing spines that had stopped him racing. He is currently enjoying his schooling.

Irving is relaxed and enjoying his retraining
Photo: Mark Beaumont

Irving, born in 2008, arrived at the centre in February this year. He too had keyhole surgery for kissing spines and is being given expert help with other issues.

A third horse enjoying his time at the centre is bay gelding  Zigger Zagger, born in 2009 and previously trained by Richard Rowe.

Zigger Zagger is retraining well for a life outside racing
Photo: Mark Beaumont

Mary said: ” Zigger Zagger is loving his time here and will give someone a really good time as a very safe hack and he is a horse that loves to school. He is good looking, strong and resilient with much to give.”

Don’t forget to get tickets for Moorcroft’s annual charity raceday at Plumpton on Monday October 22. It is this worthy charity’s most important annual fundraising event and this year it is hoped to exceed last year’s record sum raised for charity.

For more information on tickets ring Allison at Plumpton on 01273 890383 or Mary at Moorcroft on 07920 666408 for information about events and essential fundraising work for this centre of excellence.

 

Safety First for Lancashire Constabulary Mounted Branch

Lancashire Constabulary’s Mounted Branch (LCMB) led by example when taking part in the British Horse Society’s (BHS) Ride Safe Award, demonstrating to riders how important it is to protect themselves when riding.

The three hour practical assessment saw the officers ride in a variety of environments, including a riding school demonstration and continuing on to the streets of Penwortham for an on the job evaluation, demonstrating their safety skills and knowledge.

Following successful completion of the assessment, five officers and BHS North West Regional Manager Lyndsay Dring, who took the award alongside LCMB, were presented with their Ride Safe Award.

The British Horse Society’s Director of Safety, Alan Hiscox said: “We’re thrilled that Lancashire Constabulary took our Ride Safe Award, which enables all riders to have the knowledge and skills to protect themselves. We hope that this award, together with our Dead Slow campaign to educate drivers how to safely pass horses on the road, can potentially help to save the lives of horses, riders and drivers.”

Lancashire Constabulary’s Mounted Branch taking part in the BHS Ride Safe Award
Photo: Lancashire Constabulary

Sgt Adam Pearson from Lancashire Constabulary Mounted Branch said: “We work closely with The British Horse Society. It is a wonderful organisation that the community should engage with and use their comprehensive website which offers advice for all road users. We looked forward to our assessment day and also our continued work with The British Horse Society in the future.”

Road safety is a particular concern for many horse riders, including the LCMB.

The BHS launched its Dead Slow campaign in 2016 in response to alarming statistics from the BHS horseaccidents.org.uk website showing that since 2010, 230 horses have died, and 39 riders have been killed on UK roads.

One in five reported incidents involved a vehicle actually colliding with a horse, and 84 per cent of incidents occurred because the vehicle passed too fast or close to the horse. Four behaviour change messages from the BHS for drivers are:

If I see a horse, I will

· Slow down to a maximum of 15 mph

· Be patient – I will not sound my horn or rev my engine

· Pass the horse wide and slow, at least a car’s width (if possible)

· Drive slowly away

The BHS Ride Safe award is run throughout the UK, and is open to riders of all ages and abilities. The award is designed to provide riders with the skills and knowledge to ride in all environments, keeping both riders and horses safe.

To find out more visit: bhs.org.uk/ride-safe-award

South Downs RDA group’s new home

South Downs Riding for the Disabled group has announced that it has sadly had to relocate from Bridge House Equestrian Centre at Slinfold, due to redevelopment of the site.

The group’s new home is at the Horsham and Mid Sussex Equestrian Academy (HMSEA) at Albourne near Burgess Hill, West Sussex, where it runs three sessions on Wednesday mornings.

The group enjoyed five very successful and happy years at Bridge House during which time the owners, Liz and Chris McIlwraith, and wonderful liveries there, so kindly loaned their ponies to the group. Also they were always incredibly supportive.

However HMSEA has extended a very warm welcome to the group and all of its riders, and after the upheaval of the move all are settling nicely into the new surroundings.

Amanda with RDA horse Beau
Photo: South Downs RDA group

The group is now on its summer break but everyone concerned is looking forward to getting back in the saddle on September 12 and are eager to encourage new volunteers and local organisations and companies to get involved.

South Downs RDA will have a stand at the Albourne Village Show to be held on the village green at Albourne on Saturday September 1 2018 from 12noon to 4.30 pm and would be delighted to chat with anyone interested in joining the group or just learning more about the work they do.

The group has an impressive history, for it was founded in 1977 and operated not far from the South Downs at Upper Beeding. Three decades later it moved to the equestrian centre at Brinsbury College and in 2013 moved to Bridge House Equestrian Centre at Slinfold.

Now it is well settled at Albourne. where the ideal facilities, with outdoor and indoor schools,enable itt o operate year round and for its riders to enjoy riding outside in good weather.

On Wednesday mornings, it runs three riding sessions, offering riding opportunities to adults and children with quite a broad spectrum of disabilities from brain injury to autism and dyspraxia.

The ratio of volunteers to riders is necessarily high.   For every rider the group need a volunteer to lead the horse and at least one side-walker to walk (or run!) alongside the rider, to give guidance and to offer support and reassurance

The riding experience can be hugely rewarding – it can be exciting, or have a calming effect, it can give freedom,  and a unique experience of movement never possible ‘on the ground’ and for many just a very special interaction with the ponies and horses which are at the centre of everything the group does.

Carolyn Heitman, Chairman of our group explains “we need a specific type of horse that can cope with the differences that come with disabled people.   We have to do a lot of work with the horses to prepare them.  Even something as simple as having two people walking alongside a horse, whilst being ridden, is unusual for a horse, and can be unsettling for them”.

Whilst part of the Riding for the Disabled Association, which is a national charity, each group is run as an individual charity, and as such it is self-funding, and all members of the group are volunteers.

See the group’s website: www.southdownsrda.org  and also Facebook or ring Carolyn Heitman on 01403 711867   Also see Facebook@SouthDownsRDA

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Under 18’s race free campaign

Brighton Racecourse will be bringing fun for all the family, with its Sunday Funday on September 2. The special family fixture combines a multitude of free family entertainment alongside a breathtaking backdrop of horseracing, all of which is completely free for children under 18
Alongside seven quality races, additional family entertainment includes live music, fairground rides and face painting, with adult tickets starting at just £10 per person.

The event forms part of Great British Racing’s Under 18s Race Free campaign, which has been created to highlight the fact that young people can go racing for free at more than 200 racedays up and down the country this summer. These include more than 50 special family days, when Britain’s racecourses provide a range of free additional, family-friendly activities for youngsters, making it a brilliant – and truly affordable – day out for the whole family.

To support the campaign, David Walliams, a Britain’s Got Talent judge and star of hit show Little Britain, has teamed up with Great British Racing to create a series of comedy sketches that promote the fact that under 18s race free.

 The series, entitled ‘Horsing Around’ and written by Walliams, also stars The Crown actor, Billy Jenkins.

Jockey Ryan Moore

Keen to teach his father (Walliams) about a day at the races, Billy has to endure his father’s bumbling character in a series of scenes. Brighton-born jockey Ryan Moore, whose father Gary is one of the region’s most successful racehorse trainers, is the surprise star of one of the episodes. Walliams character is unaware of Moore’s status as one of the world’s greatest jockeys, and immediately causes awkwardness by asking the three-time British Champion where they can find a decent jockey, much to the embarrassment of his son, horseracing whizz Billy (played by Jenkins).

David Walliams said: “I really think the Under 18s Race Free campaign is great. So often, kids’ days out can be expensive for the family, so this could be a fun and different day out for everyone where kids go free. There are a lot of fun things children can do at the races, so it’s great to be part of a campaign to educate families.”

Ryan Moore added: “My kids love David Walliams so I knew that there would be trouble if I didn’t get involved in the filming with him. I think this is a great initiative and it’s so important that we get more children and families involved in the sport and coming racing.”

See under18sracefrr.com to watch Horsing Around and find your local family raceday.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Dr. S. Davidson, BVMS, MRCVS at the Sussex Equine Hospital discusses Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in this feature.

 

Dr Sarah Davidson, Veterinary Associate, Sussex Equine Hospital

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a frequently seen disease that horses can suffer from that is also known as Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO), ‘broken wind’ or ‘heaves’. It is a chronic condition often diagnosed following a horse becoming wheezy, developing laboured breathing, coughing and occasionally accompanied by a nasal discharge.

 The cause of COPD is an allergic reaction to allergens in the air such as dust, mould or fungal spores that are usually completely harmless, similar to asthma in people. The allergens pertaining to COPD mean that it is often a disease affecting horses that eat hay and are bedded on straw. They enter the horse’s lungs during normal respiration and the horse’s hypersensitive immune system overreacts.

The lungs become inflamed which causes the airway to narrow and mucus production to increase as a response. This results in the clinical signs we see mentioned above. It is also where the term ‘heaves’ comes from. The narrowed airways mean the normal respiratory muscles need to recruit help from other muscles such abdominal muscles. As these begin to work overtime, they grow in size and produce ‘heave’ lines seen horizontally on the belly.

 Diagnosis of COPD is usually based on a thorough clinical examination, history and occasionally an endoscopic examination of the trachea, where samples are taken and analysed.

 

A horse being treated for the disease

While most COPD cases are diagnosed once a horse starts struggling with exercise or coughing, some horses will present in acute respiratory distress. The horse may be nostril flaring, standing with the neck extended, breathing rapidly and sweating and it can be very distressing for owners to witness. In these cases, it is very important that owners remain calm, take the horse slowly and quietly outside to fresh air and call your vet immediately.

Treatment is based around minimising exposure to allergens and careful management. As an adjunct, medications can be used, but a lot of horses will improve with management changes alone. Improving your horse’s air hygiene is first and foremost to keep them happy and healthy, while maximising their athletic potential. However, it is important to note that acute respiratory flare-ups can be very serious and on the odd occasion, fatal.

A life in the field is the ideal management technique for horses suffering with COPD but this is not always practical. If your horse must be stabled sometimes or all the time, the following may help.

  • Minimise dust and maximise air hygiene in the stable.
  • Soak hay (60 minutes) to remove dust (any longer and the soaking will reduce carbohydrates) or feed a low-dust alternative such as haylage.
  • Feed from the ground to encourage mucus drainage. In the wild, a horse will graze for up to 20 hours a day and having the head lower helps mucus to drain from the lungs. However, in domestic life, horses are often fed from haynets, buckets or mangers which can mean that mucus builds up.
  • Bedding should be as dust-free as possible. Rubber matting with paper- or dust-extracted shavings is the best option. Rubber matting is expensive to install but, in the long run, will minimise veterinary bills from repeat visits! In extreme cases, rubber matting can be used on its own and washed daily.
  • Good ventilation inside the stable is vital.
  • Managing all horses in the stable block to help the individual with respiratory issues is very important, although can prove tricky on a livery yard. Making sure the affected horse is outside for mucking out and sweeping (and for a short time after to allow dust and spores to settle) will make a big difference.

 

As mentioned before, not all cases can be resolved fully with management. There are four broad categories of drug that can be employed to help.

  • Bronchodilators which help to open up the airways and allow the horse to breath more easily.
  • Corticosteroids which reduce lung inflammation and decrease the severity of the hypersensitivity reaction.
  • Anti-histamines also reduce the severity of the hypersensitivity reaction and are best given pre-emptively.
  • Mucolytics can help to make the horse’s mucus less viscous and, therefore, easier to clear.

These medications can be delivered intravenously or using an inhaler or nebuliser as a gas directly into the lungs. As with any medication, if it’s being used in a horse that is competing racing, withdrawal times should be carefully observed.

A variation of this condition can be Summer Pasture Associated Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or SPAOPD. This is brought on by allergies to pasture allergens and management of this condition is the reverse of the above:  horses should be stabled during the day in the summer in well-ventilated and cool areas.