Jockey Steve Drowne retires on a winner

Flat jockey Steve Drowne (45) has hung up his boots after an impressive 27 years during which he has ridden more than 1,400 winners, including six Group 1 victories. He ended his career at Lingfield on Sunday on an impressive winning note.

He guided 6-1 shot Met By Moonlight to an impressive win for trainer Ron Hodges. It was the second of two rides for the trainer at the meeting.

Steve Drowne said it was appropriate to end his riding career with  a winner for Hodges, because it was with that trainer that his career really took off. His earlier of two rides that day for the trainer, Dream of Glory finished unplaced in the 2.50pm.  and Met By Moonlight in the 3.30pm.

Jockey Steve Drowne
Photo: John Smithson

Looking back  on a career that has produced more than 1,400 winners worldwide, including at least one on every course in the UK, he said: “I’ve had a good old innings, but we all know that at some time it has to come to an end. It would have been nice to have won the Derby and a few more big races, but apart from that I’ve no regrets at all.”

Drowne’s Group 1 triumphs include four in Europe’s top sprints, with wins in the Prix de l’Abbaye on Patavellian and Avonbridge for Roger Charlton plus a July Cup for Hughie Morrison on Sakhee’s Secret and more recently a Nunthorpe for Robert Cowell on Jwala.

He missed 2012 on health grounds but otherwise has continued in the saddle  from 2013 and had ridden 20 winners in 2017, the most recent of them Pearl Acclaim, a sprinter, for David Griffiths at Southwell last month, and more than 600 placed horses in the last five years.

 

Competitive jump racing at Fontwell Park

Fontwell Park starts 2018 with an excellent programme of jump racing. The opening meeting for the year is on Monday January 8 with a six-race card that promises competitive jump racing at this highly popular Sussex track.

Top class action at Fontwell Park

Gates open at 11.15, with plenty of catering facilities for visitors to enjoy before the first race at 1.15pm.   There is the opportunity to get close to the horses as they parade in the paddock before going out on to the track for each race.

Fontwell Park’s attractive surroundings

Fine viewing from the stands enables racegoers to see all the action throughout racing and Fontwell Park has two enclosures. The Grandstand and Paddock enclosure gives access to three grandstands, the parade ring, winning circle and a number of bars and food outlets.

Fontwell’s Premier enclosure includes all of the above plus access to the ground floor of the Premier Grandstand. This has a large indoor bar and premier café as well as seated viewing overlooking the Winning Post.

Get close to the action-jockeys coming out of Fontwell Park’s weighing room Photo: Jeannie Knight

 

There is an excellent programme of racing for 2018, which continues with jump racing on Sunday January 21, Sunday January 28, February 15, and the Totepool National Spirit Hurdle raceday on February 25.

For full information about facilities available visit www.fontwellpark.co.uk/whats-on

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Think before you breed

‘Think Before You Breed’ aims to stop the over-production of poor quality horses and ponies in the UK. Many people may find it surprising that the British Horse Society is campaigning to reduce the number of horses in this country, however the evidence that equine over-production is a significant welfare problem is overwhelming, and something needs to be done to prevent the suffering of more horses and ponies in the UK.

Accurately gauging the number of horses currently in the United Kingdom is impossible. The most recent and widely accepted estimate came from the British Equestrian Trade Association (BETA) survey conducted in 2006 which placed the number at 1.35 million. However, there are very reasonable grounds for considering this to be an underestimation.

Uncontrolled pony breeding

It’s clear that there are more horses, ponies and donkeys than there are experienced and knowledgeable homes available to care for them. At the end of 2007, 11,476 horses were in the care of member charities of the National Equine Welfare Council (NEWC) alone. Anecdotally all charities and sanctuaries are reporting an increase in the number of admissions or requests for admission which is, at least in part, due to the recession.

Few industries have escaped the recession and the financial climate has had a major effect on horse sales. The market has slowed dramatically with even quality horses selling for far lower prices than they previously achieved. The situation is far more serious at the bottom end of the market with poor quality animals regularly achieving less than the price of a tank of petrol. Horse and Hound (20/12/08) reported ponies being sold at a North Wales market for just £35 and The Irish Times carried a story about animals changing hands for as little as €20 or being swapped for a computer game.

There has to be concern for the fate of such cheap animals. Horses and ponies are complex animals with specific needs and are likely to suffer if bought by inexperienced or unknowledgeable people. Additionally, while the purchase price is decreasing, the costs of keeping a horse are markedly on the increase meaning that anyone lured into horse-ownership because they now find the initial outlay affordable is likely to run into financial difficulties caring for their animal. The net result is that yet more horses will suffer.
The evidence that there is significant equine overproduction in the UK is overwhelming. However, tackling the issue is not straightforward. A multi-faceted approach is required to address each of the individual equine sectors appropriately.

Raising funds for such work is extremely difficult. However, the argument is strong that the vast majority of equine welfare cases are a direct result of over-production.

Rider’s plight to go on DIY SOS

South Downs Riding for the Disabled group, based at Bridge House Equestrian Centre, Slinfold celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2017. This was highlighted  by a celebratory event in June for everyone.
Riders, volunteers and supporters of the group enjoyed a programme, which included professional equine displays, demonstrations by their own riders, afternoon tea and lots more.
One major and very exciting event during 2017 was the selection of one of the group’s riders, Amanda Worne,  to feature in the popular BBC television programme DIY SOS.

Amanda suffered an horrific cycling accident in  August 2015 on Bury Hill, West Sussex, which left her paralysed from the waist down, but this inspirational woman, aged 44 with four children, refused to allow this set-back to get her down.

Nick Knowles with Amanada’s horse and the DIY SOS team

In addition to other sports activities, in 2016 she started riding with the South Downs group and indeed took part in a dressage display at its anniversary celebrations.

Whilst the DIY SOS team were carrying out the work on Amanda and husband Vic’s home at Arundel, presenter Nick Knowles and the team came to Slinfold to film her riding. The episode featuring Amanda is due to go on air on January 4 2018 on BBC1 at
8pm.

Amanda with some of the DIY SOS team Photo: RDA

Despite her life changing injuries, Amanda now works part time at Stoke Mandeville hospital and has published a book, ‘The Sky Is Not The Limit’ under the name of Amanda Newton, published by John Blake Books, about her life during the first year after her accident.
The group’s final fundraising event of the year is a raffle of two return flights to New York, generously donated by Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd. Tickets can be purchased direct from volunteers or online at: www.zaffo.com/riding-for-the-disabled.

The tickets are £5 each and the draw will take place on Thursday, January 11 2018. All profits will go to South Downs RDA group.

The group is always delighted to hear from any individuals or organisations that would be interested in becoming involved in their work, there are many ways in which people can help and further information can be found on the website at: www.southdownsrda.org.

Competitive Boxing Day racing at Fontwell Park

FONTWELL Park’s traditional Boxing Day meeting attracted a good crowd, which enjoyed an afternoon of competitive racing. The opening Conditional Jockeys’ Handicap Hurdle, run over two miles three furlongs set the standard with a thrilling finale, in which only a neck separated the first two home.

In the final stages Ben Hicks and Michael Heard fought out the finish in fine style with Michael Heard going on to bring 6-4 favourite Oskar Denarius home to win by a neck for trainer Jennifer Mason from 13-2 shot River Dun, trained by David Pipe. Back in third was Jeb’s Gamble, trained at Findon by Nick Gifford,  and this horse will come on for the experience having finished well clear of the remainder of the runners.

Oskar Denarius is ridden to victory by Michael Heard  Photo courtesy of Fontwell Park

 

A good local winner emerged in the juvenile hurdle over two miles one furlong, when Horsham trainer Gary Moore sent out Aiguille Rouge, partnered by his son, jockey Jamie Moore, to a four length victory over 2-1 shot Spirit of Rome.

Spirit of Rome, still only a three-year-old,  is trained by Harry Whittington but was no match for Moore’s talented French-bred chestnut filly, which is owned locally by The Winning Hand racing group. She was held up in the race but took the lead approaching the final obstacle running on in impressive fashion, making an interesting prospect for the future.

Highway One O One in action ridden by James Owen
Photo: Fontwell Park

Highway One O One, trained by Chris Gordon, continued to impress when he won the James Tod Novices Hurdle over two miles one and a half furlongs comfortably. Owned by Anthony Ward-Thomas, the Irish-bred five-year-old is improving with every run. This time he beat Canyouringmeback (Ire), which is definitely one for the notebook .

Trained by Nick Gifford at Downs Stables, Findon, there is a lot to like about Canyouringmeback, a five-year-old,owned by T C McKeever. He has previously run in a couple of Irish points to points and is a decent sort who will benefit from more racing experience, going on to do well.

Bredon Hill Lad enjoys racing at Fontwell Park and this meeting was no exception. Trained by Sue Gardner, he was partnered as usual by her daughter Lucy to an easy two-length victory in the Handicap Chase of the day over Atlantic Roller, a 13-2 shot trained by Chris Gordon, depriving him of a double one the day.

Gary and Jamie Moore completed a double when winning the two mile one furlong handicap hurdle.  Their 9-4 favourite Knocknanuss scored his third hurdles victory  after he took the lead approaching two out. His win was at the expense of Notre Ami, a promising and lightly raced six-year-old trained by Nick Gifford at Findon, which is improving with every run. His winning turn will come.

Trainer Anna Newton-Smith has a good record at Fontwell Park and added to it at this meeting with a victory from 5-2 shot Goring One under veteran jockey Andrew Thornton. They won by more than four lengths from the Jeremy Scott-trained Colmer Hill.

Goring One and Andrew Thornton on the way to a win Photo: Fontwell Park Racing

The final race- a Mares’ Handicap Hurdle- was won in decisive manner by Somerset trainer Jeremy Scott. He sent out Ellens Way at 7-2, ridden by Matt Griffiths, to win by 14 lengths.

The next meeting at Fontwell Park is on Monday January 8.

Gates OpenFirst Race 13:15pm , Last Race15:45pm.

Don’t miss good racing at Fontwell Park today

Gates are open at Fontwell Park racecourse for an excellent Boxing Day programme of jump racing at this popular Sussex track, where the first race is at at 12.10pm.

Boxing Day Racing at Fontwell Park
Image courtesy of Fontell Park Racecourse

The Southern Cranes and Access Conditional Jockeys Handicap Hurdle opens a good card- and has attracted nine runners, headed by likely favourite Oskar Denarius trained by Jennifer Mason with Ben Hicks in the saddle.
Local trainer Nick Gifford has his string in fine form at present and sends out Alka Step with Conor Ring in the saddle, while Gary Moore’s Yuokon Delta, at 16-1 is ridden by William Clarke.

The juvenile hurdle has only four runners but Oxford Blu,trained by Olly Murphy and ridden by Ian Popham seems to be the one to beat-and is likely to be odds-on.
The two miles one furlong novice hurdle will be more of a competitive affair, but is headed by dual winner this season, Highway One O One, trained by Chris Gordon, which is a useful performer and likely to make this three wins on the trot.

The two mile one furlong handicap chase could see Nick Gifford’s Brown Bear gaining a  victory over course winner Bredon Hill Lad, trained by Sue Gardner.

Brown Bear, pictured by Michael Harris, being washed down following his Ascot victory.

This classy horse won in fine style at Ascot in September and if he handles the Fontwell track as well as he did Ascot, he has the class to take this in front of his local owners’ group.

Trainer Gary Moore and son Jamie ought to take the spoils in the
handicap hurdle with Knocknanuss.

Like Sully, trained by Richard Rowe at nearby Sullington has been running into form recently, and has the assistance of Leighton Aspell in the saddle here, helping to compensate for top weight.

He would be a popular local winner if able to overturn favourite and triple winner,Silent Man sent out by trainer Tom Weston with Sean Bowen up.

Olympia spectacular

RIDERS of a different kind stole the show on day four of Olympia, The London International Horse Show before Christmas. Ten of the most renowned jockeys from the world of flat and National Hunt racing took to the Olympia Grand Hall for the Markel Champions Challenge in aid of the Injured Jockeys Fund, with Sir AP McCoy’s team of ‘legends’ coming out on top.

The day kicked-off with the Olympia Senior Showing Series Championships sponsored by Anthony D Evans Insurance. Jayne Harper and her 20-year-old black gelding, Crimewave II, triumphed in the ridden section and Alice Stratton and the 13-year-old Welsh Section B gelding Laithehill Pashsa won the in-hand final.

Three CSI5* Show Jumping competitions and a FEI World CupTM Driving Leg provided top class international action from start to finish, with Maikel Van der Vleuten taking the pinnacle of the day’s Show Jumping, the 1.60m Longines Christmas Cracker. Meanwhile, showing his father Frankie how it is done, there was a win for Rocco Dettori in the Osborne Refrigerators Shetland Pony event.

Skilled Dutchman Maikel Van der Vleuten, who has triumped so often there in the Olympia arena, was victorious again, this time on the 12-year-old bay mare VDL Groep Arera C in The Longines Christmas Cracker when clocking up  0.19 seconds less than one of the world’s best horsemen- German Olympian Marcus Ehning (Comme Il Faut).

It was an international affair with Frenchman Simon Delestre third on Teavanta ll and another Dutchman, quiet horseman Harrie Smolders fourth on Cas.

There was no home cheer until ninth place, filled by Sussex favourite Ben Maher on Don Vito, but the London Olympic gold medallist later climbed to third in the Leading Rider of Show table.

Ben Maher

In earlier classes, Belgium’s Francois Mathy Jnr set an unbeatable target from an early draw in The Snowflake Stakes, a speed class. Riding Falco van de Clehoeve, he held off a challenge from Britain’s Cayenne Puissance winner Laura Renwick, this time riding MHS Washington.

“Because I was so early to go I was hoping for a finish in the top five, so I am happy about how it finished,” said Francois. “This is the type of class where Falco has been quite competitive. He’s a special horse with a special personality.”

Germany’s Daniel Deusser, winner of the 2014 FEI World CupTM Final, triumphed in a nine-horse jump-off in The Keith Prowse Snowman Stakes on SX Hidalgo VG.

Florida-based Amanda Derbyshire was fourth and highest placed Brit on Luibanta BH. Amanda, who is trained by the unmatchable Nick Skelton, and used to compete Olympic champion Big Star as a youngster, admitted that her aim was to be talent-spotted for the British team.

“It’s much warmer in Florida and I did wonder whether I wanted to travel over, but then I thought maybe I’d never get another invitation!” she said. “I was really quite over-excited when I arrived but I’m a bit more relaxed now. It’s fantastic to be here at Olympia.”

Frankie Detorri show jumping Photo: Olympia

In earlier classes, Belgium’s Francois Mathy Jnr set an unbeatable target from an early draw in The Snowflake Stakes, a speed class. Riding Falco van de Clehoeve, he held off a challenge from Britain’s Cayenne Puissance winner Laura Renwick, this time riding MHS Washington.

“Because I was so early to go I was hoping for a finish in the top five, so I am happy about how it finished,” said Francois. “This is the type of class where Falco has been quite competitive. He’s a special horse with a special personality.”

Germany’s Daniel Deusser, winner of the 2014 FEI World CupTM Final, triumphed in a nine-horse jump-off in The Keith Prowse Snowman Stakes on SX Hidalgo VG.

Florida-based Amanda Derbyshire was fourth and highest placed Brit on Luibanta BH. Amanda, who is trained by the unmatchable Nick Skelton, and used to compete Olympic champion Big Star as a youngster, admitted that her aim was to be talent-spotted for the British team.

“It’s much warmer in Florida and I did wonder whether I wanted to travel over, but then I thought maybe I’d never get another invitation!” she said. “I was really quite over-excited when I arrived but I’m a bit more relaxed now. It’s fantastic to be here at Olympia.”

In earlier classes, Belgium’s Francois Mathy Jnr set an unbeatable target from an early draw in The Snowflake Stakes, a speed class. Riding Falco van de Clehoeve, he held off a challenge from Britain’s Cayenne Puissance winner Laura Renwick, this time riding MHS Washington.

“Because I was so early to go I was hoping for a finish in the top five, so I am happy about how it finished,” said Francois. “This is the type of class where Falco has been quite competitive. He’s a special horse with a special personality.”

Germany’s Daniel Deusser, winner of the 2014 FEI World CupTM Final, triumphed in a nine-horse jump-off in The Keith Prowse Snowman Stakes on SX Hidalgo VG.

Florida-based Amanda Derbyshire was fourth and highest placed Brit on Luibanta BH. Amanda, who is trained by the unmatchable Nick Skelton, and used to compete Olympic champion Big Star as a youngster, admitted that her aim was to be talent-spotted for the British team.

“It’s much warmer in Florida and I did wonder whether I wanted to travel over, but then I thought maybe I’d never get another invitation!” she said. “I was really quite over-excited when I arrived but I’m a bit more relaxed now. It’s fantastic to be here at Olympia.”

How to cope with equine emergencies

In this latest veterinary feature, Dr Chris Baldwin BVetMed(hons) MRCVS of  Sussex Equine Hospital, based at Ashington, discusses how to cope with equine emergencies

Dr Chris Baldwin   BVetMed(hons) MRCVS  of Sussex Equine Hospital based at Ashington

Equine emergencies come in all different shapes and sizes but there are a few things you can do if you are faced with an equine emergency that will help both you and your horse in that potentially difficult time.

Regardless of the emergency it is imperative you consider your own safety first. If your horse is colicing and violently thrashing in either the field or stable do not endanger yourself trying to stop your horse rolling. It must be remembered that contrary to old thoughts a horse rolling will not twist its gut in the process of rolling. Phone your vet for advice and so your vet can start travelling to you and once you have done that then phone anyone else you feel should be involved or could be of help. Once your vet arrives they will take charge of the situation. Most of the time emergencies can be quickly resolved but getting veterinary advice sooner rather than later is key.

Occasionally your vet may need the owner to give consent to either a procedure, referral or euthanasia. Therefore, if you are with a horse that requires emergency veterinary care and you are not able to make any of those decisions it is advantageous to contact the owner or decision maker prior to the vet arriving. This allows you to inform the owner of the situation so if your vet requires owner consent then that consent can be quickly obtained thus speeding up the process of treating the horse.

Sometimes emergency situations require a greater level of diagnostics or treatments than can be provided at the stables. If the horse does have to be referred then prior to the vet arriving it is sensible to get together anything you may need for the journey and make transport arrangements if you don’t have reliable transport yourself. A small bag packed ready with your horse’s passport, travel boots and bandages, rugs and head collar is a quick way to be organised ready for any transport needs. It is also sensible to have anything you may need in this bag.

Time is usually of the essence in an emergency situation. Therefore, if you feel your horse may require veterinary attention then it is advisable to phone your vet early. Your vet may have some practical advice for you that can resolve the issue without a call out, equally if your vet feels it is an emergency that requires veterinary intervention then they can start to make their way to you and start treating your horse.

Emergencies can be a scary and stressful time, whether your horse is colicing, bleeding from a wound, very lame or suffering another ailment. The best piece of advice is to keep calm, things always appear far worse than they usually are, but if you are worried then call for advise sooner rather than later. If your horse has a wound and it is bleeding profusely then wrapping a clean bandage around the wound will slow the bleeding. Wounds can be tricky, small cuts can require surgery where large fleshy wounds may only require a stitch up or just bandaging. Taking a picture of the wound to send to your vet and then call them for advice will allow your vet to give you advise on what to do next. Most wounds, even those that look horrendous are not life threatening. Your vet may advise you to hose the wound, this helps clean the wound before your vet arrives to assess the injury, cleaning the wound early helps reduce the risk of infection later on. If your horse is lame and unable to move, again call your vet, don’t try to move your horse until they have been properly assessed.

The recurrent theme throughout this article is to keep calm and call for advice. Most of us are lucky enough to have mobile phones but sometimes we are hacking out or we stable our horses in an area with terrible reception. If you are riding alone or going to be out of signal then let people around you know where you are going and what time you will be back. Most of us are lucky enough to have a network of friends and family to help us in an emergency, even if it is just to put the kettle on, make a cup of tea and take a few deep breaths. Vets are here to help 24/7 if you need us, think you need us or you’re not sure, so call us and we can help you.

Dr. C. Baldwin, BVetMed, MRCVS

Dressage at Hickstead 2017

Dressage At Hickstead can look back on an outstanding summer season in 2017 when British riders enjoyed success in  CDIO3*/CDI2*/CDIYJP/CDIU25 at the  Sussex venue from July 27-30, with a number of them proving unbeatable at their respective levels.

The crowd was thrilled to see dressage star Charlotte Dujardin in action and, consistent with their good form, she and Hawtins Delicato were the ones to beat in the small tour divisions. The nine-year-old son of Diamond Hit, who has been earmarked by owner Carl Hester as his future Grand Prix horse, won by a margin of four percent before going on to victory in Friday’s Inter I.

Charlotte Dujardin in action Photo: British Dressage

“I’m so so proud of ‘Del’ who continues his super form to win the Inter I today. He’s such an exciting horse,” said Charlotte at the time.

Heading into Saturday’s Inter I Freestyle full of confidence, the pair rode an expressive test to a Simon and Garfunkel soundtrack. Their performance was not without mistake, as they had some glitches in the changes, but the quality of their work raked in the marks.

The pair earned a final of score of 77.85 per cent to take the class ahead of the emerging partnership of Maria Eilberg and Farah Al Khojai’s Sir Donnerhall gelding, Sarotti 57. Maria and Sarotti posted their best score to date of 75.62 per cent..

2009 European team silver medallist, Maria, also impressed aboard Royal Concert with victory in the Intermediate A and Intermediate B with cracking marks of 73.11 per cent and 68.61 per cent. The 14-year-old ‘Rico’ who is owned by Maria, BD Chairman Penny Pollard and Hermione Black, ‘kept his cool’ to show what he’s capable of and give a taste of what’s to come.

In the Grand Prix, British riders were kept at bay by their European and American counterparts, the class going to Frenchman Pierre Volla with the mare Baninda Altena. The French fielded a strong team, using Hickstead as a final opportunity to pick their quartet for the European Championships later this month. The highest placed Brit was Emma Hindle and her 11-year-old mare Romy Del Sol, scoring 70.70 per cent to place sixth.

Saturday’s Grand Prix Special also belonged to Volla, however the young British partnership of Becky Moody and Carinsio made an impression with an exciting second place.

Richard Davison and Bubblingh continued their run of form to win the Grand Prix Freestyle. Richard and ‘Bubbles’, Gwendolyn Sontheim’s 11-year-old son of Ballaseyr Royale, scored 74.18 per cent ahead of the Netherlands’ Jean-Rene Luijmes and Ashwin in second (73.04 per cent) and popular British lady rider Louise Bell with former working hunter champion, Into the Blue, in third (71.36 per cent).

Free Thursday admission to 2018 Hickstead Derby meeting

For the first time ever, Hickstead will be offering free admission on the Thursday of the Al Shira’aa Hickstead Derby meeting next year.

Following in the footsteps of the successful introduction of a ‘shopping day’ at other equestrian events, Hickstead will be allowing free general admission entry to spectators on the Thursday of the show, which is the fjrst day of international competition .

“We have more than 150 trade stands in the Charles Owen Shopping Village at our June meeting, and we want to encourage as many visitors as possible to come along and browse the fabulous selection of shops,” said Hickstead Director Lizzie Bunn.

Free Thursday entry to Hickstead next year

A small booking charge will apply plus a £10 charge per vehicle for car parking, and tickets and parking must be reserved online in advance.

There will be a total of seven rings in action during the show, with thousands of competitors ranging from tiny riders and ponies competing in the NSEA Hickstead Mini Challenge right up to Olympic showjumpers and some of the sport’s best horses.

Thursday’s showjumping highlights include the Stoner Jewellers’ Vase and the Bunn Leisure Derby Tankard. Other highlights include the Driving Concours D’Elegance, the British Private Driving Derby and a whole host of national showjumping qualifiers.

As well as equestrian action and the extensive Charles Owen Shopping Village, the show offers a range of bars, restaurants and eateries. A new Family Zone will also be introduced to the showground, featuring local entertainer Tomfoolery, while Fun Fair rides will be offered at half price on the Thursday and Friday of the show.

Top show jumping action during the day

The feature class of the June meeting is, of course, the famous Al Shira’aa Derby, held on the Sunday afternoon of the show. This year a host of national and international stars will return to the All England Jumping Course in the hope of taking the title, which was won last year by Nigel Coupe and Golvers Hill.

It is the second year that the fixture will run under the title sponsorship of Al Shira’aa. Tom O’Brien, the UK Manager of Al Shira’aa, said: “We’re delighted to be entering our second year of sponsoring this iconic event, and indeed the whole Hickstead Derby Meeting. It’s a fantastic date in the showjumping calendar and with so much on offer it is definitely four days not to miss out on. We are very excited to see whether the 2018 Al Shira’aa Derby can top the first win by Nigel Coupe in 2017.”

Tickets for the Al Shira’aa Hickstead Derby Meeting are on sale now, with discounts applying to all tickets bought online in advance of the show. Purchased tickets can be immediately downloaded and printed, making them ideal for last-minute Christmas gifts.

Another new option for 2018 is the chance to upgrade to the forward car park, which is situated close to the open and covered grandstands, right  behind the International Arena. Upgrading your parking pass to this area costs an additional £10 to the standard £10 parking charge, and is available from the Friday to the Sunday of the show.

To purchase tickets and for more information, contact https://hickstead.ticketsrv.co.uk/

Photo caption: The Thursday of the Al Shira’aa Hickstead Derby Meeting will now feature free general admission entry to spectators