Initiative to teach children how to pass horses safely

The British Horse Society (BHS) and Canewdon Equestrians have launched a new initiative  (18 October) to teach primary school children between the ages of 9-11 years old on how to pass horses safely on the road as pedestrians, cyclists and passengers in a car.

The launch took place at Westerings Primary Academy, along with pupils from Holt Farm Junior School in Essex, where a tragic road accident took place in 2016 resulting in the death of a horse and injury of its rider.

Westering Primary School children learning about horse safety  Photo: British Horse Society

Following the launch which is supported by local councillor, Julie Gooding and MP Mark Francois it is hoped that the scheme will be rolled out by the BHS to primary schools across the UK.

The scheme has been developed after alarming statistics revealed over 845 road incidents involving horses and drivers have been reported to the BHS in the last year, with 60 of those happening in the South East of the country, leading to the death of four horses and one person.

The Society collates statistics each year as part of their Dead or Dead Slow campaign to understand the rate of incidents involving horses and riders on UK roads, enabling them to educate all road users and lobby government in making the roads safer for not only horses and riders, but drivers and passengers too, which have played a huge part in implementing.

Alan Hiscox, Director of Safety at The British Horse Society said: “We’re really pleased to be working on this fantastic project and one that we hope will eventually be delivered in all primary schools across the UK.

“Our Dead or Dead Slow campaign which educates drivers and horse riders on how to stay safe when they encounter one another on the road has already been hugely successful, but worryingly, only one in 10 incidents are reported to us each year so the actual number is likely to be much higher. By educating children as well as adults, I really believe we can help to save even more lives in the future.”

Claire Lilley from Canewdon Equestrians added: “I am so happy that this important project is finally coming to life. I have been a rider in the area for many years and in that time, I witnessed a tragic car accident involving my friend and her horse, Angel who was sadly killed during the collision.

“Together, with the help of our local councillor, Julie Gooding and MP Mark Francois, Canewdon Equestrians have raised so much awareness on the importance of driving safely around horses and after an initial pilot lesson with some of the local children, it became very clear that not only did they enjoy it but they had a huge part to play in educating the general public.”

Councillor Julie Gooding  said “My background of working in schools as a professional youth worker  gave me the insight to know the power young minds have when educated at an early age.

“I suggested working with schools to raise awareness of the dangers that can affect vulnerable road users. This includes pedestrians,  cyclists,  drivers and passengers.

“Working with Canewdon Equestrians we devised a fun interactive programme to include role play in all aspects of road users, given that horses are a flight animal.  The British Horse Society has supported our initiative and developed it to be acceptable with other road safety authorities.“

To find out more information about The Road Safety Awareness Project and to donate to the BHS, please visit: https://www.bhs.org.uk/our-work/safety/henry-the-horse

Competitive jump racing at Plumpton

Harry Cobden and Colin Tizzard successfully combined to win the opening race at Plumpton with 11-4 second favourite.War Lord. This was a good victory for the horse had chased the leaders and made a mistake three from home, taking the lead at the last and was driven out to win.

War Lord- ridden by  Harry Cobden and trained  by Colin Tizzard   Photo courtesy of Plujmpton Racecourse

The 2-1 Favourite German bred King of the Sand ( Gary and Jamie Moore), could only finish third. jumped left at times, not fluent 4th, headed last, lost 2nd flat, no extra towards finish Runner up Jackson Hill ridden  by 3lb claimer Kevin Jones for trainer MF Harris took second place.
The Nick Embiricos Memorial handicap chase over two miles three furlongs attracted just five runners but was won comfortably by Wenceslaus, a seven-year-old gelding trained by David Bridgwater and ridden by Tom Cannon on only his second run over fences, having finished third on his debut.
He is a nice looking chaser in the making, coming home six lengths clear of runner-up Enforcement  trained by Martin Keighley and ridden by James Best, with Code of Law ( Neil Mullholland and Robert Dunn) in third place.
In the Novices Handicap Hurdle there was an exciting finish when owner and amateur rider Phillip York partnered his five-year-old bay mare Maegens Moon to her second hurdles victory by just a neck from the David Bridgwater trained Coby Nine, ridden by 5lb claimer Mitchell  Bastyan.
Drama followed in the A Spirit Of Love Memorial Race- a chase over two miles and three furlongs when leader My Way, sent off at 10/3, trained by Paul Nicholls and ridden by Adrian Heskin fell at the last obstacle when holding a half a length lead. The race went to 12-1 shot Legal Eyes, trained  by Ben Pauling with Nico de Boinville in the saddle.
In the Bob Champion Cancer Trust Handicap Hurdle over two and a half miles,  Newmarket trainer Lucy Wadham sent out the winner, when five-year-old mare Sambra, ridden by 5lb claimer Maxime Tissier, put in a fine performance to clinch victory in the final stages of the race.
Held up for most of the race, she made progress from four lout, taking the lead at the third and was driven on the flat to win by a short head from Dan McGrue, ridden by Harry Cobden and trained by Paul Nicholls.  Lewes trainer Suzy Smith sent out the promising Rosy World to clinch third place.
The Novices Handicap Chase over three miles one furlong saw a good win for Irish bred five-year-old Uallrightharry, trained by Linda Jewell and ridden by Brendan Powell.
The combination beat Irish  bred Dont Be Robin, trained  by M rs R Ford and ridden by R P McLernon, with Hit The Highway, at 13-2.trained by Chris Gordon and ridden by Tom Cannon finishing close behind in third place.

BHS launches legacy campaign

The British Horse Society (BHS) has launched its brand new legacy campaign with a legacy guide and a powerful new film which premiered on Horse and Country TV.

The guide and film, appealing to horse lovers to consider leaving a gift in their will to the BHS, depicts the tremendous impact and influence horses have had on our lives over the years gone by.

New initiative for the British Horse Society

Tracy Casstles, Director of Fundraising at The British Horse Society said: “I am absolutely delighted to be launching this new legacy campaign with a film that we have put our heart and soul in to.

“We hope that, as fellow horse lovers, you’ll be able to see the transformative difference a gift in your Will could have on the future of horses and all those who care for them. The launch of our new legacy campaign is an exciting new step for the Society, and one that we sincerely hope you will consider joining us on.”

The film will be shown on Horse and Country for the next three months.

To view the film online please head to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvmTj2nm-cI

For more information on leaving a legacy to the BHS head to bhs.org.uk/legacy or email funding@bhs.org.uk or call 02476 840458.

Don’t miss Plumpton raceday

AN excellent day of racing at Plumpton on Monday (October 21) will benefit the Bob Champion Cancer Trust with gates open at 12pm and the first of seven races starting at 2.10pm and the last race at 5.10pm.

The feature race of the day is the “Spirit of Love” Memorial Race Chase (a novices’ limited handicap).

The Bob Champion Charity Trust is a fitting choice of charity to benefit from this raceday because of Bob’s connection with racing and, in particular, his links to Plumpton where he rode his first career winner in 1968 on Altercation.

Bob said “Plumpton is one of my favourite courses and I was lucky enough to ride for Isidore Kerman and he certainly had some great horses. I have always enjoyed visiting the course over the years but this Charity Raceday will be something special and I am thrilled that it is benefiting the Trust.

Expect competitive racing at Plumpton today.
Photo: Jeannie Knight

“Our researchers are achieving great results – you never know we may even be able to make a research announcement on the day! I’m really looking forward to it and hope many racegoers will join us on the day.”

With the raceday committee chaired by Tim Fox, the day aims to build on previous years’ charity successes when more than £70,000 has been raised on the day for charitable causes.

Trainer Chris Gordon and jockey Tom Cannon receiving awards in a previous year at Plumpton from Tim Fox, who is chairman of the Bob Champion Trust Raceday this year                                   Photo: Jeannie Knight

Tim said:  “We were delighted to be invited by Plumpton to hold a fundraising raceday on behalf of the Bob Champion Cancer Trust and are very much looking forward to the day. It is such a worthwhile charity which raises funds to support the cancer research programmes at the University of East Anglia and the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton, Surrey.

“To date more than £15 million has been raised and this wonderful cause together with Bob’s career in racing and connection with Plumpton promises to make this a very memorable day.”

 

 

 

New initiative to teach children horse safety

The British Horse Society (BHS) and Canewdon Equestrians have launched a new initiative  to teach primary school children between the ages of 9-11 years old on how to pass horses safely on the road as pedestrians, cyclists and passengers in a car.

Holt Farm Junior School & the BHS

The launch ook place at Westerings Primary Academy, along with pupils from Holt Farm Junior School in Essex, where a tragic road accident took place in 2016 resulting in the death of a horse and injury of its rider.

Following the launch, which was supported by local councillor, Julie Gooding and MP Mark Francois, it is hoped that the scheme will be rolled out by the BHS to primary schools across the UK.

The scheme has been developed after alarming statistics revealed more than 845 road incidents involving horses and drivers have been reported to the BHS in the last year, with 60 of those happening in the South East of the country, leading to the death of four horses and one person.

The Society collates statistics each year as part of their Dead or Dead Slow campaign to understand the rate of incidents involving horses and riders on UK roads, enabling them to educate all road users and lobby government in making the roads safer for not only horses and riders, but drivers and passengers too, which have played a huge part in implementing.

Alan Hiscox, Director of Safety at The British Horse Society said: “We’re really pleased to be working on this fantastic project and one that we hope will eventually be delivered in all primary schools across the UK.

“Our Dead or Dead Slow campaign which educates drivers and horse riders on how to stay safe when they encounter one another on the road has already been hugely successful, but worryingly, only one in 10 incidents are reported to us each year so the actual number is likely to be much higher. By educating children as well as adults, I really believe we can help to save even more lives in the future.

” Claire Lilley from Canewdon Equestrians added: “I am so happy that this important project is finally coming to life. I have been a rider in the area for many years and in that time, I witnessed a tragic car accident involving my friend and her horse, Angel who was sadly killed during the collision.

“Together, with the help of our local councillor, Julie Gooding and MP Mark Francois, Canewdon Equestrians have raised so much awareness on the importance of driving safely around horses and after an initial pilot lesson with some of the local children, it became very clear that not only did they enjoy it but they had a huge part to play in educating the general public.”

To find out more information about The Road Safety Awareness Project and to donate to the BHS, please visit: https://www.bhs.org.uk/our-work/safety/henry-the-horse

High praise for new Hickstead facilities

HICKSTEAD has some outstanding feedback from users of its new cross-country facilities.

Burghley winner Pippa Funnell described them as ‘fantastic’ while Gemma Tattersall chose the ‘incredible arena’ as her final prep run for Pau.

Gemma Tattersall competing with Chico Bella owned by Chris and Lisa Stone   Photo: British Eventing

If you haven’t yet visited Hickstead and seen these outstanding new all-weather cross-country schooling facilities, you are missing out.

There are fences from 80cm up to 1.10m, including the vast Equine America water complex, and many other jumping options to be enjoyed.

Book online at https://hicksteadschooling.co.uk/ and don’t forget the special offer – if you book three sessions, you get a fourth one free!

Hickstead also enjoyed welcoming ThisEsme back to Hickstead to let her be among the very first people to sample the new set-up.

There is plenty more coming up at Hickstead, including the opening weekend of its Arena Polo season on October 26/27. Then there is the Showtime Ball to look forward to on November 16.

This will be followed by the Riders’ Ball  on December 7, so keep checking Hickstead website for updates.

Contact details are:

The All England Jumping Course
Hickstead
West Sussex
RH17 5NU

01273 834315 or
schooling@hickstead.co.uk

WHW celebrates Rehome A Horse Month

Dedicated horse-woman Tasha from Fife rehomed World Horse Welfare Alicia from Belwade Farm Rescue and Rehoming Centre last October and is now encouraging others to do the same as her shy little rescue pony has become a showing super cob!

As World Horse Welfare celebrates Rehome A Horse Month this October, to highlight the benefits of rehoming and encouraging the public to consider rehoming a horse instead of buying or breeding, local rehomer Tasha is keen to share Alicia’s rags to riches story.

Alicia and Tasha pictured above

Alicia was resued by the charity as a frightened, unhandled youngster. The dedicated team at Belwade Farm nursed her back to health and slowly helped her to trust humans again. When the time came for her to be rehomed it would take someone very special to see the potential of this brave little pony. Step forward Tasha.

Tasha was looking for a project to bring on in showing and instantly saw Alicia’s potential. She said: “I saw this little hairy cob in the field, with tonnes of feather and tonnes of hair and thought she would do well in the show ring. We clicked pretty quickly. She was a bit nervous when she first arrived…now everyone loves her. She’s got a lovely temperament. She’s definitely cheeky but she’s well into work.”

Alicia was backed to ride last October and then spent the winter resting, but 2019 has seen the hard-working pair achieve great things. Having competed in a number of disciplines, including dressage, showing in-hand and showing under saddle, they have qualified for the Traditional of The Year 2020 in two categories: Quest for a Star and In-hand Showing, as well as qualifying for the Caledonian Showing Championships later this month.

One of the largest equine events in the showing calendar, Equifest, is next on Tasha and Alicia’s hit list and given their incredible success in their first season, their prospects are looking good.

Tasha said: “Whatever she wants to do, we’ll do. If she just wants to be a hacking pony then that’s all we’ll do, but it will be really nice to get her out…showing off what rescue ponies can do.”

Tasha described her experience rehoming through World Horse Welfare as ‘lovely and supportive’ and said it was good to know that if her circumstances change Alicia can always return to the charity, which will make sure she is looked after for the rest of her life.

World Horse Welfare is asking the horse community to take two simple actions to show their support for horse welfare and help World Horse Welfare to make 2019 a record-breaking rehoming year:

  1. Spread the rehoming message by visiting worldhorsewelfare.org/rehoming and sharing the profile of at least one horse or pony across your social media network.
  2. Display one of its Rehoming Rocks window stickers in your car, lorry, caravan, at home, in your office, at your yard, local veterinary surgery or riding school.
  3. Help it encourage more people to consider rehoming a horse which has had a difficult start in life.
  4. You can get your sticker for FREE at any World Horse Welfare Rescue and Rehoming Centre. Anyone who can carry a small stock of the stickers at till points or reception desks can email RHOTY@worldhorsewelfare.org putting window stickers in the subject line.

There are currently around 80 horses available for rehoming from World Horse Welfare.

Rehomed Horse of the Year Competition 2019

As part of Rehome a Horse Month, World Horse Welfare is launching its annual Rehomed Horse of the Year Competition, which is open to its community of 1,700 rehomers who care for more than 1,800 rehomed horses from the charity.

Rehomed Horse of the Year 2019 will invite rehomers from across the UK to share images that capture a moment in their horse’s life, celebrate the special connection they have with their rehomed horse and reveal hilarious anecdotes that caused jaws to drop.

The three new 2019 categories are supported by three wonderful judges:

  1. In the picture (photography): Judge, The Horse Photographer, Matthew Seed
    Rehomers are asked to share an image that tells a story about their rehomed horse or captures a poignant moment in their life, along with a 100 word picture caption.
  2. An unbreakable bond: Judge, BBC Radio 2 DJ and charity Patron, Sara Cox
    We love hearing about the unique connections our rehomers have with their rehomed horse. This category asks them to share a story that sums about why their horse human bond is so special – whether they had an instant connection or whether their horse was the trusted friend they needed during a difficult time in their life.
  3. I wasn’t expecting THAT!: Judge, internet sensation, This Esme
    We know horses have a wonderful talent for surprising us! We are asking for hilarious anecdotes or red-faced moments that left everyone astounded.

The winner of the overall Supreme Champion will be judged by Showjumper Joe Stockdale.

The winner of the Unbreakable Bond category will be invited to receive their award at the British Breeders’ Awards Dinner in London on 11 January 2020.  World Horse Welfare’s Deputy Chief Executive Tony Tyler explained:

“We are forthright advocates of responsible breeding and so were absolutely delighted to be invited to make our Rehomed Horse of the Year competition part of this event. We strongly encourage accountability, good welfare and responsible ownership in all areas of breeding. Our Unbreakable Bond category underlines the fact that horses are not simply a commodity and they should be given a lifetime of care where their welfare is always of paramount importance.”

Rehomed Horse of the Year 2019 entries close on Thursday 31 October 2019. Full details of the competition, including terms and conditions, can be found at www.worldhorsewelfare.org/RHOTY2019

Ascot big race could move to inner course after 30mm rain

The Qipco Champion Stakes and two other races on the round course at Ascot, due to take place this coming Saturday, October 19, have been affected by waterlogging after 30mm of rain at the weekend.

It is possible they could now  be moved to the inner course following emergency plans drawn up in 2016 to guarantee that racing takes place under the best possible underfoot conditions.

Ascot’s outer track, which would normally be used for the fixture and for all others on the Flat, was waterlogged in places following the downpour.

The inner track, left unwatered through the summer, unlike the Flat track, is good to soft, soft in places despite the heavy downpour that resulted in 134mm  rainfall on Ascot since September 21.

Clerk of course Chris Stickels

After walking the track on Sunday morning, clerk of the course Chris Stickels described conditions as the softest and wettest he had ever known them.

The change in going has resulted in a switch in betting, with French soft ground specialist The Revenant, trained  at Longchamp by Francis Graffard, emerging as current favourite.

Martin Clunes launches new equine partnership

Martin Clunes, actor and president of leading equine charity, The British Horse Society (BHS) visited the Limes Equestrian Centre  at Wattisfield in Suffolk recently to help launch a new partnership between the BHS and RSPC.

The partnership is a bid to help both neglected horses and young people who are *NEET (not in education, employment or training) under the BHS’s Changing Lives through Horses (CLtH) scheme.

Martin Clunes at the launch with Gareth Johnson, equine welfare operations manager at RSPCA , along with a representative of the British Horse Society.

 

The number of horses being subjected to neglect is at an all-time high and rehoming centres are full. CLtH is now working to get rescued horses from the RSPCA into BHS Approved Riding Centres where they can be rehabilitated alongside participants on the scheme.

Limes Equestrian Centre runs the CLtH programme and is one of the first BHS Approved Riding Centres to rehome two rescue horses, Cobain and Barlow who will work with the young people on the programme.

The programme aims to reignite a desire to learn and encourages participants to return to education or employment. The young people aged from 10 to 24 years old, are more suited to an alternative education due to a range of complex reasons, and the programme helps them to reconnect with society through working with horses.

Martin Clunes, President of the BHS said; “I couldn’t be happier about supporting this new collaboration between the BHS and the RSPCA. I’ve been a massive fan of the BHS’s Changing Lives through Horses programme since it launched three years ago.

“The programme is aimed at the young people and helping them get back into education and the workplace. It’s about learning new skills in a unique environment and now, we are also helping horses to have a new start in life too. It doesn’t get any better.”

For many of the young people on the programme, it is their last opportunity and they have often been referred by their school, local authority or police.

This programme, which is delivered by specially trained BHS Accredited Professional Coaches, gives them the chance to develop their skills enabling them to return to education and/or employment and prevent them from becoming NEET because both charities believe that horses are a powerful, emotive way of inspiring young people to reconnect with society, and the difficult backgrounds experienced by many of the participants makes them particularly able to relate to the horses they are working with.

Gareth Johnson, Equine Welfare Operations Manager at the RSPCA said: “The Changing Lives through Horses programme is undoubtedly one of the best schemes I have been involved with in rehoming RSPCA rescue horses.

“This is a fantastic opportunity for young people and horses to come together and interact. The RSPCA has 886 horses in our care at present; we hope that this collaboration will help to alleviate this problem. ”

This programme relies on public donations and grant funding. Please consider making a donation, visit; bhs.org.uk/changinglivesthroughhorses or text ‘CLTH65 £5’ to 70070 to start changing someone’s life.

 

Horse safety on roads campaign

Surrey Police is taking part in Rural Crime Awareness Week, a national campaign that started this week and will be focusing on road safety in rural areas.

Chief Inspector, Michael Hodder said: ‘’Rural Crime can affect individuals, businesses and communities and Surrey Police are keen to build the most effective links to ensure we tackle rural crime in the most efficient way.

“The British Horse Society is working with us on operational activities throughout the week.”

Horse safety on the roads being emphasised

Alan Hiscox, Director of Safety at The British Horse Society said: “We’re grateful to Surrey Police for allowing us to work with them during Rural Crime Awareness Week.

“It is important to educate drivers on a horse’s natural flight instinct, which means it can suddenly react to something it’s unsure of, such as a fast approaching vehicle. This sudden reaction to avoid a perceived threat can have potentially devastating consequences for all involved.

“The British Horse Society launched its Dead Slow campaign to help educate drivers on how to safely pass a horse on the road. The key messages to drivers are:

If I see a horse on the road then I will:

  • slow down to a maximum of 15mph,
  • be patient (don’t sound the horn or rev the engine),
  • pass the horse wide and slow (at least a cars width if possible) and drive slowly away

If drivers follow these four simple messages, and both riders and drivers show patience and courtesy to one another, the level of incidents occurring on our roads can be decreased.”

If you have been a victim of rural crime, or have any intelligence relating to crime committed in rural areas please report this to Surrey Police on 101 or anonymously to the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.